Vichy GOP collaboration: why have Republican leaders abandoned their principles for #BunkerBoy

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harvkey / YouTube The end of the movie Casablanca 1591281837.jpg...
harvkey / YouTube

Technically, Vichy was neutral in the war, but they basically danced to the Germans’ tune…and because they controlled Casablanca and other French colonies, we can see that playing out in the film. In direct terms, Renault’s dumping his Vichy water signals that he’s no longer willing to be the puppet.

It’s worth reading Anne Applebaum’s Atlantic article “History Will Judge the Complicit”, or does the GOP wish to reveal the truth of conservative principles as oxymoron.

“The question now is whether the old American mantras, the appeals to traditions of democracy and the rule of law, still work—or whether they have now become just another competing narrative in the information war.”  

What would it take for Republican leaders to admit to themselves that Trump’s loyalty cult is destroying the country they claim to love?

To the american reader, references to Vichy France, East Germany, fascists, and Communists may seem over-the-top, even ludicrous. But dig a little deeper, and the analogy makes sense. The point is not to compare Trump to Hitler or Stalin; the point is to compare the experiences of high-ranking members of the American Republican Party, especially those who work most closely with the White House, to the experiences of Frenchmen in 1940, or of East Germans in 1945, or of Czesław Miłosz in 1947. These are experiences of people who are forced to accept an alien ideology or a set of values that are in sharp conflict with their own.

Senate Judiciary Committee member Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) shouts while questioning Judge Brett Kavanaugh during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing in the Dirksen Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill September 27, 2018 in Washington, DC. - University professor Christine Blasey Ford, 51, told a tense Senate Judiciary Committee hearing that could make or break Kavanaugh's nomination she was "100 percent" certain he was the assailant and it was "absolutely not" a case of mistaken identify. (Photo by Andrew Harnik / POOL / AFP)        (Photo credit should read ANDREW HARNIK/AFP/Getty Images)

Not even Trump’s supporters can contest this analogy, because the imposition of an alien ideology is precisely what he was calling for all along. Trump’s first statement as president, his inaugural address, was an unprecedented assault on American democracy and American values. Remember: He described America’s capital city, America’s government, America’s congressmen and senators—all democratically elected and chosen by Americans, according to America’s 227-year-old Constitution—as an “establishment” that had profited at the expense of “the people.” “Their victories have not been your victories,” he said. “Their triumphs have not been your triumphs.” Trump was stating, as clearly as he possibly could, that a new set of values was now replacing the old, though of course the nature of those new values was not yet clear.

Read: ‘American Carnage’: The Trump era begins

Almost as soon as he stopped speaking, Trump launched his first assault on fact-based reality, a long-undervalued component of the American political system. We are not a theocracy or a monarchy that accepts the word of the leader or the priesthood as law. We are a democracy that debates facts, seeks to understand problems, and then legislates solutions, all in accordance with a set of rules. Trump’s insistence—against the evidence of photographs, television footage, and the lived experience of thousands of people—that the attendance at his inauguration was higher than at Barack Obama’s first inauguration represented a sharp break with that American political tradition. Like the authoritarian leaders of other times and places, Trump effectively ordered not just his supporters but also apolitical members of the government bureaucracy to adhere to a blatantly false, manipulated reality. American politicians, like politicians everywhere, have always covered up mistakes, held back information, and made promises they could not keep. But until Trump was president, none of them induced the National Park Service to produce doctored photographs or compelled the White House press secretary to lie about the size of a crowd—or encouraged him to do so in front of a press corps that knew he knew he was lying.

www.theatlantic.com/…

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2 Comments on "Vichy GOP collaboration: why have Republican leaders abandoned their principles for #BunkerBoy"

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SimonDK
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SimonDK

New US motto under Trump; Work, Pray, Obey!
Coincidently the Vichy motto was Labor, Family, Fatherland
Travail, Famille, Patrie.
Pétain, the hero of WW1, got prison time after WW2 for his role as head of state of the Vichy government.
Trump has no past deeds to soften the judgement on his failures as president, moreover his current term isn’t over yet and the only option he has at this point, to make people listen and obey him, is to threaten the use of tactical nukes.

fishouttaH2o
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fishouttaH2o

They haven’t abandoned their principles. Racism. Money funneled to their wealthy donors & corporations, tax cuts for rich people, extremist Judges, oppression of women & minorities, voter suppression, violent suppression of peaceful protestors, cuts to social programs. They support a man that mocks disabled people & rape victims & advocates for law enforcement to brutalize our own citizens. They can’t abandon their principles when they didn’t have any to begin with.