Several Ohio Republicans publicly expressed interest on Monday in running to succeed GOP Sen. Rob Portman in the hours following his surprise retirement announcement, and a few more are now making noises about getting in. The most prominent among them is the far-right extremist Rep. Jim Jordan, who infamously delivered a speech on the floor of the House just before the Jan. 6 terrorist riot where he repeated Donald Trump’s lies about the 2020 presidential race and questioned how “somehow the guy who never left his house wins the election?”

Jordan did not rule out the idea of a Senate bid when asked this week, saying, “We’ll see. I’m focused on my work on the Judiciary Committee … and this crazy impeachment trial.” Back in November, Cleveland.com reported that Jordan was considering a primary bid against Gov. Mike DeWine, who infuriated Trump by recognizing Joe Biden’s victory. However, at least one consultant was very skeptical Jordan would run to lead the state, and we heard anything new about a potential gubernatorial campaign in the ensuing two months.

Several more of Jordan’s current or former House colleagues are also talking about seeking the GOP nod for Senate. Rep. Bill Johnson said, “I am seriously considering this opportunity and over the next few weeks, I will talk to my family, friends and supporters to determine if this is the right time and the right opportunity.” Fellow Rep. Brad Wenstrup also said he would talk to people about his future, though he didn’t lay out a timeline for when he’d decide

Former Rep. Pat Tiberi, for his part, said Monday that “there will be a time and place to discuss his successor, but that day is not today.” Tiberi considered running for the state’s other Senate seat in 2017 against Democratic incumbent Sherrod Brown, but he not only passed, he decided later that year to resign from Congress altogether to lead a business group. Tiberi, though, retains a $5 million war chest that he could use on another bid for federal office.

Another Republican who has expressed interest is state Sen. Matt Dolan, who is a co-owner of the Cleveland Indians team and whom Cleveland.com’s Andrew Tobias describes as “a more-moderate, business friendly Republican.” Tobias also says of the potential electoral effects of Dolan’s status as a team owner, [W]hether or not that’s an advantage depends on what the front office is doing, so that’s open to debate right now.”

Two Republicans, though, have said no to a Senate campaign: Rep. Troy Balderson and Youngstown State President Jim Tressel. Tressel, who is widely known as the championship-winning former head football coach at the Ohio State University, has been mentioned as a potential statewide candidate for years but has never gone for it, and the 68-year-old university head seemed to definitively rule out running for office this week when he said, “Too busy here at YSU to run for the Senate … it is time for the young guys to step up.”

On the Democratic side, Dayton Mayor Nan Whaley acknowledged to the New York Times that she was considering both a Senate run or a campaign against DeWine for governor. Whaley didn’t indicate which office she’d prefer but seemed especially motivated to stop Jordan from representing Ohio in the Senate, saying, “If Jim Jordan decides to run [for Senate], it is highly likely he will win that primary. We recognize that the soul of our state is at stake, and that’s a motivation to all of us.”

Daily Kos

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